Category Archives: startup

Origin Stories of Innovation™: The Power of Creative Naiveté [Interview series]

Paul Earle shares extraordinary podcast interviews that reveal the innovative genius (trials and triumphs) behind great brands and institutions. Today, Innovation Excellence launches Season One called Origin Stories of Innovation™.

Origin Stories of Innovation™: The Power of Creative Naiveté [Interview series]

Paul Earle shares extraordinary podcast interviews that reveal the innovative genius (trials and triumphs) behind great brands and institutions. Today, Innovation Excellence launches Season One called Origin Stories of Innovation™.

Innovate like a startup or like big business?

Startups are king when it comes to innovation. Indeed, established companies often strive to behave more like startups. But in reality, it is quite challenging. Startups, on the other hand, wish they had access to resources, particularly capital. So, there’s something to be said for the large corporation: It has experience, distribution channels, and access ...

Behavioral Innovation: the need to pivot, why we don’t and what we can do

Behavioral Innovation: the need to pivot, why we don’t and what we can do  - Innovation ExcellenceWhen was the last time you seriously thought about your blue chip investments going broke? At what point will those shares be worth nothing? Although it may sound ridiculous, the question is serious because at the current rate of disruption, half of the Australian Stock Index S&P 500 will be replaced over the next 10 years. Where does that leave your investments? The need and act of a business pivoting is natural. It can almost be seen as a form of corporate evolution. Over the years, the largest businesses only keep their top spots by evolving and chasing the sunrise markets and leaving the sunsets. Intel famously pivoted from manufacturing memory sticks to microprocessors. HP pivoted from making precision oscillators to computers and peripherals. And Nokia has famously taken its business model from a paper mill to rubber goods and then finally to mobile phones until they crashed, failing to … Continue reading