Category Archives: Open Innovation

Cultivating a Fail Fast Culture – Manifesting learning and exploration

This is the second blog in a series of 3 blogs, by Janet Sernack, on cultivating a fail fast culture. In my previous blog “What does it mean to cultivate a fail fast organizational culture” I shared what typically happens when people experience failure, and how important it is to uncouple people’s fears about failure ...

Have You Tried New Ways to Innovate?

After relying on cost and operational efficiencies to grow the bottom line, many businesses are emerging from an innovation slumber post-recession. Now there is an imperative to refocus on organic growth. The importance of innovation in driving this growth is resurfacing to the top of the agenda. For many organizations, there are some radically new behavioural, structural and operational models of meeting this challenge are gaining popularity.

Crossing the Internal Chasm in Corporate Innovation

There is a huge noise around what companies should do to find the big ideas. Compared to it, the discussion about the best way of turning those ideas into substantial businesses is almost silent. We think it is high time to change this.

Why the Test & Learn Approach Does Not Work

The in-market test & learn approach to innovation is becoming increasingly common, because it meets the cultural needs of modern businesses to behave entrepreneurially. At The Strategy Distillery we believe (and have witnessed) this approach is life threatening to the future success of a newly launched product or service. Here's why...

Innovation is a Confusing Word

Is there any word more fundamental to the modern business lexicon than ‘innovation’? To say that it forms an important part of enterprise is probably an understatement. If we take renowned researcher John Seeley Brown’s definition, the very nature of doing business is an act of innovation: that is, innovation is invention — of any ...

The Ideas Problem

Ideas are the problem. I suspect many of you have heard this statement as often as I have. It’s usually translated as “we don’t have enough ideas”. Yet when you dig beneath the surface, you find that the bald statement isn’t always as it first appears. In this post, I’d like to offer some different translations of “Ideas are the problem”.