Category Archives: Culture of Innovation

MICRO LEARNING for Innovators (in just 15 minutes per week)

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Innovation is a huge topic in organizations these days. Every company is looking for new and better ways to do more with less, differentiate themselves from the competition, and unlock the hidden genius of their workforce.

At the same time, many organizations are budget-constrained. Flying in an outside consultant to lead a workshop or training can sometimes be cost prohibitive. This I understand.

Which is precisely why my company, Idea Champions, is now offering Jump Starting Innovation, a cost-effective way to stir the innovation soup -- a virtual, self-organizing, just-in-time way to increase everyone's ability to be a proactive innovator on-the-job. And it only requires 15 minutes per week.

TOPICS INCLUDE: Culture of Innovation, Creative Thinking, Idea Generation, Brainstorm Facilitation, Storytelling, Leadership, Mindset, Teamwork & Collaboration, Meeting Mastery, Listening & Feedback, Problem Solving, and Employee Engagement.

5 Inexpensive Ways to Jump Start a Sustainable Culture of Innovation

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Trying to create a culture of innovation is a daunting task for even the most committed organization. Cultures take decades to form. Changing them is not an overnight phenomenon, no matter how many outside consultants you've gotten on the case. You might as well try to end world hunger or wipe out Aids overnight. It's gonna take a while.

But if you and your colleagues are game, culture change is possible. The question, of course, is where to begin? Starting is always the hardest part. And, in the absence of clarity about where to start, procrastination creeps in -- and nothing changes.

3 Keys To Creating Meaningful Innovation In Your Marketplace

The phrase “disruptive innovation” gets thrown around a lot. The way we describe disruptive innovation has moved far past Clay Christensen’s original use of the phrase. Yet, it’s one of those buzzwords that we often use but don’t necessarily know what it means, or how to create it. It’s hard to achieve the goal of ...

MICRO LEARNING for Innovators (in just 15 minutes per week)

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Innovation is a huge topic in organizations these days. Every company is looking for new and better ways to do more with less, differentiate themselves from the competition, and unlock the hidden genius of their workforce.

At the same time, many organizations are budget-constrained. Flying in an outside consultant to lead a workshop or training can sometimes be cost prohibitive. This I understand.

Which is precisely why my company, Idea Champions, is now offering Jump Starting Innovation, a cost-effective way to stir the innovation soup -- a virtual, self-organizing, just-in-time way to increase everyone's ability to be a proactive innovator on-the-job. And it only requires 15 minutes per week.

TOPICS INCLUDE: Creative Thinking, Culture of Innovation, Brainstorm Facilitation, Storytelling, Leadership, Mindset, Motivation, Collaboration, Facilitation, Listening, Humor, and Change.

The Idiot Savant’s Guide to Accelerating Culture Change

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Imagine, for the moment, that you have been tasked with the challenge of addressing the need for "culture change" within your team, department, or entire organization. I'm assuming you didn't go to graduate school in "culture change" and that you also have a lot of other stuff on your plate. Correct? I thought so. Yours is a curious challenge that will require some major clarity on the front end, skillful facilitation in the middle, and meaningful follow-up on the back end.

"Corporate culture change" is a head banger. It's easy to talk about, but hard off to pull off. To increase your odds of success, lower your stress, and help you navigate your way through the maze, here are seven points to consider -- a homeopathic dose of what I've learned since 1987, providing various innovation sparking services to a whole bunch of forward thinking companies. Ready? Probably not, but keep reading anyway.

12 Ways to Make Bad Decisions

Boss Swivel.jpgThere are three things that astound me about most organizations: The cro-magnon way performance reviews are done; the pitiful way brainstorm sessions are run and; the voo doo way decisions are made.

What follows is an elaboration of the third -- 12 common phenomena that contribute to funky decision making. As you read, think of the teams you work most closely with, which of these behaviors describes them, and what you can do to change the game.

1. Selective Search for Evidence: Gathering facts that support pre-determined conclusions, but disregard other facts that support different conclusions.

2. Premature Termination of Search for Evidence: Accepting the first alternative that looks like it might work.

HOW TO JUMP START INNOVATION with Mind-Opening, Curated Content for Your Intranet

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Innovation is a huge topic in organizations these days. Every company is looking for new and better ways to do more with less, differentiate themselves from the competition, and unlock the hidden genius of their workforce. At the same time, many organizations are budget-constrained. Flying in an outside consultant to lead a workshop or training can sometimes be cost prohibitive. This I understand.

Which is precisely why my company, Idea Champions, is now offering forward-thinking companies a much less expensive way to stir the innovation soup -- a virtual, self-organizing, low-cost, just-in-time way that gets everyone into the act.

VOICE AMERICA RADIO INTERVIEW with Mitch Ditkoff on Fostering a Culture of Innovation

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Here's everything you wanted to know about how to foster a culture of innovation in your organization -- a 56-minute VOICE AMERICA radio interview with Mitch Ditkoff, Co-Founder and President of Idea Champions and the writer of this blog. OK. maybe it's not everything you wanted to know, but at least it's trending in that direction. (Please forgive me for using the word "trending". I don't like that word. It just kind of slipped out).

The main thing? Click the link above and listen to the interview. Good food for thought -- something you might want to forward to you manager or other senior leaders in your company -- especially if they are claiming some interest in the "innovation thing."

Idea Champions
Culture of Innovation workshop
MitchDitkoff.com

Innovation Sighting: Yet Another Multiplication in Cameras

Camera LensThanks to Light’s newest camera innovation, serious photographers may make it through their upcoming shot lists with a welcomed spring to their step. In attempt to lessen the load of the average DSLR camera, Light created the streamlined L16. Not surprisingly, the innovation of this camera reflects one of the five innovation templates in Systematic Inventive Thinking (SIT), the Multiplication Technique.

The Multiplication Technique is defined as copying an element already existing in the product or service but changing it in some counterintuitive way. Many innovations in cameras, including the basis of photography itself, are based on copying a component and then altering it. Utilizing this innovative pattern, Light replaced the typical DSLR lens with 16 smaller lenses, resulting in a compact camera which claims to provide the same quality photos as the standard DSLR.

As described in Tech Crunch:

The Light L16 is so-named because it has 16 camera modules, and it combines images from multiple modules at once to create images with greater depth, clarity, detail, color rendering and general quality than you’d otherwise be able to get out of a device that’s essentially the size of a thick smartphone. The L16’s sample images show depth-of-field and sharpness that would leave many DSLRs in the dust, in fact, which is the whole idea of the multi-module array.

The L16 is just one example of the benefit to creating with the use of innovation templates. To use the Multiplication Technique, begin by listing the components of the product, process, or service. You pick one of those components, make a copy of it. You keep the original component as is, but the copied component is changed. That creates the virtual product. Using Function Follows Form, you look for potential benefits, and you modify or adapt the concept to improve it to yield an innovative idea.

You can view the below video to see the Multiplication Technique at work in the L16.