Peeking Behind the Veil of Design

Peeking Behind the Veil of DesignA company in Dubai is asking me to teach a design thinking and innovation course in May of next year, and this was good synchronicity because I came across the video below recently. The design process is often very mysterious to people, and the way that designers pursue the design of a new object is often hard for people to grasp. But the design thinking methodology... Continue reading

Aha: 8 Habits of People Who Always Have Great Ideas

Schoolgirl Flickr freeImagine being able to come up with fantastic ideas and solutions to challenges at the drop of a hat. Are you that kind of thinker?  It turns out that most ideators have cultivated daily habits that lend themselves to thinking up great ideas.   over at Fast Company has a pretty good idea about how this happens:

Eureka moments are rare. The backstory behind great ideas is often more complex and winding than having an apple fall on your head. But the best part is that creative ideas aren’t reserved for a special group of people; they can come to anyone if you change your mind-set.

“The fact is, almost all of the research in this field shows that anyone with normal intelligence is capable of doing some degree of creative work,” Teresa Amabile, professor of business administration at Harvard Business School and author of The Progress Principle: Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work, told Fast Company in 2004. “Creativity depends on a number of things: experience, including knowledge and technical skills; talent; an ability to think in new ways; and the capacity to push through uncreative dry spells.”

Whether they’re coming up with an innovative new product to launch, finding a solution to a universal problem, or picking a cool new place to grab lunch, people who consistently have great ideas have formed habits that help them think. Here are eight simple things those “creative geniuses” do that you can do, too:

1. They Look For Inspiration In Unexpected Places

Instead of staying focused within their industries, people who have great ideas look elsewhere, says Sooshin Choi, provost at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit.

“Many professionals go after information in their industry, but once you get that information, it’s too late—everyone has it,” he says. “Even if you get that information faster than others, what kind of real difference can you make?”

Instead, Choi suggests looking outside your field. “Car designers might look at furniture designers for inspiration,” he says. “There are endless examples of different areas where you can find inspiration.”

Read the other 7 habits here.

Are you a creative problem solver? Take the “Mad Men” challenge!

shutterstock_124144213 - mad man paidAs Head of Creative, you've been asked to deliver an ad campaign to increase the popularity of print media. The digital revolution has significantly eroded newspaper circulation. Pitch a solution. What will you propose? Continue reading

You Choose: Creativity or Commodity?

“Creative” has become a “buzzword” according to LinkedIn. Since Creativity is my area of expertise, this was of great interest to me. In response to the LinkedIn’s finding, experts say you should not use the word in your profile because the word is losing its meaning and it makes you sound like everyone else. It’s […]

The post You Choose: Creativity or Commodity? appeared first on thinkfuture.

Key Tools for Back End of Innovation – How Philips does it

Alekasandro Grabulou, director of innovation & development of Philips, talks about key tools for redefining the role of innovation in a fast-paced era. Philips is a leader is health care, consumer lifestyle, and lighting. And, they fused their front end and back end innovation efforts, with great results and a compelling story. Continue reading

The New Social Learning

The New Social Learning - Innovation ExcellenceWhen Tony Bingham and Marcia Conner, co-authors of The New Social Learning, began talking with organizations about benefiting from the natural powers of employees learning from one another, they heard more about their obstacles than their opportunities. While some were genuine issues leaders needed to face to move their organizations forward, several were myths, perpetuated by old school practices and a fear of losing control. Continue reading

The New Social Learning

The New Social Learning - Innovation ExcellenceWhen Tony Bingham and Marcia Conner, co-authors of The New Social Learning, began talking with organizations about benefiting from the natural powers of employees learning from one another, they heard more about their obstacles than their opportunities. While some were genuine issues leaders needed to face to move their organizations forward, several were myths, perpetuated by old school practices and a fear of losing control. Continue reading